Difference between revisions of "Grace Gospel Hall, Pincourt, QC"

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==History==
 
One of the earliest ‘open’ assemblies  was located on Saint Antoine Street in Montreal. Its beginnings are lost to memory. This meeting consisted of a number of local brethren as well as others from the British West Indies. In the mid-1920s the work divided, with the more conservative element moving away. It was this latter group that would form the nucleus of what is now known as Grace Gospel Hall, a bilingual work. It was described by [[Arnold John Myers Reynolds|Arnold Reynolds]] as “the most conservative of any of the (English) assemblies”.
 
One of the earliest ‘open’ assemblies  was located on Saint Antoine Street in Montreal. Its beginnings are lost to memory. This meeting consisted of a number of local brethren as well as others from the British West Indies. In the mid-1920s the work divided, with the more conservative element moving away. It was this latter group that would form the nucleus of what is now known as Grace Gospel Hall, a bilingual work. It was described by [[Arnold John Myers Reynolds|Arnold Reynolds]] as “the most conservative of any of the (English) assemblies”.
  
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From Ville St. Laurent the assembly moved west in 2005, off the island of Montreal to its current location at 50 - 5<sup>th</sup> Avenue in the city of Pincourt. On July 4, 2013, a suspicious fire destroyed the building and, for several years, meetings were held in the nearby Presbyterian Church. A new construction was completed and occupied as of 2015.
 
From Ville St. Laurent the assembly moved west in 2005, off the island of Montreal to its current location at 50 - 5<sup>th</sup> Avenue in the city of Pincourt. On July 4, 2013, a suspicious fire destroyed the building and, for several years, meetings were held in the nearby Presbyterian Church. A new construction was completed and occupied as of 2015.
  
=SOURCES=
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==AKA==
<sup>1</sup> George W. Dixon's uncopyrighted "Looking Backward Pressing Forward", c.1993
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* Park Extension Gospel Hall 1926+
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* St. Roch Street Gospel Hall +1936+
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* Jean Talon Gospel Hall +1943-1948+
 +
* Ogilvy Avenue Gospel Hall +1950-1982
 +
* Assemblee Evangelique Grace +2013+
 +
 
 +
==Locations==
 +
* 682 St. Roch St. 1926-1936+
 +
* 750 Jean Talon +1943-1948+
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* 821 Ogilvy Ave. +1950-1980+
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* 519 Stanstead Ave., Mount Royal +1982-1993
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* 3901 Henri-Bourassa Blvd. West @ St. Laurent 1994-2006
 +
* 50 Fifth Ave. @ Pincourt 2007-2020+
 +
 
 +
==Correspondents==
 +
* William E. Reid @ Mt. Royal +1936-1966
 +
* R.A. Hamilton 1967-1969
 +
* J.H. Comte 1970-1971
 +
* W. Wardrop 1972-1974
 +
* R. Mathieu 1975-2000+
 +
* Stephen Johnston @ Beaconsfield +2003-2020+
 +
* Gilles Bouchard 2008-2009
 +
* Paul Garnet +2013-2020+
 +
 
 +
==Alumni==
 +
* [[Who’s Who at Grace Gospel Hall, Pincourt, QC]] +1926/1983-2020+
 +
 
 +
==Sources==
 +
===History===
 +
* <sup>1</sup> George W. Dixon's uncopyrighted "Looking Backward Pressing Forward", c.1993
 +
 
 +
===AAB's===
 +
* Light & Liberty Publishing Assembly Address Book: 1936
 +
* Walterick Publishers Assembly Address Books: 1943, 1948, 1950, 1954-1956, 1958-1980, 1982-1983, 1985-1987, 1989-2000, 2003-2004, 2006-2008
 +
* ECS Ministries (Emmaus International) Assembly Address Books: 2009-2010, 2013-2014, 2016, 2018, 2020
 +
 
 +
===Other===
 +
* [http://www.ancestry.com Ancestry.com]

Latest revision as of 00:33, 21 September 2020

History

One of the earliest ‘open’ assemblies  was located on Saint Antoine Street in Montreal. Its beginnings are lost to memory. This meeting consisted of a number of local brethren as well as others from the British West Indies. In the mid-1920s the work divided, with the more conservative element moving away. It was this latter group that would form the nucleus of what is now known as Grace Gospel Hall, a bilingual work. It was described by Arnold Reynolds as “the most conservative of any of the (English) assemblies”.

"By 1926 they were meeting in the Park Extension sector of Montreal and were known as the Park Extension Gospel Hall. Encouraged by the zeal and enthusiasm for evangelism of one of the brethren, the assembly reached out to the francophone community around them through the distribution of Gospel tracts. Needless to say, they met with significant opposition. When John Spreeman and Noah Gratton first arrived in the province to begin French work in 1926 and 1933 respectively, they made this assembly their English base of operation.

Other workers among the French Canadians who were associated with and/or encouraged by this assembly included, Vincent Davey who came to Montreal in 1935 and attended Ogilvy. It was here that he likely met Della Palmer.

"They were married at the assembly in August 1941, immediately moving to the Abitibi to help out with the recently-formed French assembly at Rollet and the school for children of recent converts from Catholicism. Then there was Bert Grainger and his wife, Isabel, who came to Montreal in 1946. While they attended the Breaking of Bread with the French assembly in Montreal, they wanted their children to hear the gospel in English. Every Sunday night they attended Ogilvy Avenue Gospel Hall. When Bert was away, Isabel took the children there by streetcar and bus. Fernand Saint-Louis together with Roland Lacombe and his brother Alphonse were baptized here by Paul Boëda in 1948. As a bilingual assembly, its manifest concern for French evangelization continues to the present time.

"In the mid-1950s, the assembly, often referred to as the North End Assembly because of its location in the northern part of the city, was the largest in Montreal. There were some 100 in fellowship, all English, and they conducted an annual Bible conference. They had met for some time first on Saint-Roch Street and then Jean Talon Boulevard but by now the assembly had moved into the former St. Cuthbert’s Anglican Church building at 821 Ogilvy Avenue in the Park Extension district of the city. It was thus that for a while it came to be known by two names, either Ogilvy Avenue Gospel Hall or Park Extension Gospel Hall.

“Eventually the City of Montreal expropriated this property in order to sink the ventilating shaft for the Metro system, a project never realized. In the meantime, Grace assembly (by then Grace Gospel Hall) was now without a church home, but not for long. Through a remarkable set of circumstances, the town of Mount Royal Baptist Church allowed the use of their downstairs auditorium for all of their Sunday and mid-week meetings, and there the assembly remained for 12 years.

“Quite recently (pre-1993) we heard that the Watchtower organization had put up their building for sale. A bid was made and after much negotiation a purchase price was agreed upon. The building and the location are ideal for the Grace assembly and we have moved into 3901 Henri Bourassa W., St. Laurent.”1

From Ville St. Laurent the assembly moved west in 2005, off the island of Montreal to its current location at 50 - 5th Avenue in the city of Pincourt. On July 4, 2013, a suspicious fire destroyed the building and, for several years, meetings were held in the nearby Presbyterian Church. A new construction was completed and occupied as of 2015.

AKA

  • Park Extension Gospel Hall 1926+
  • St. Roch Street Gospel Hall +1936+
  • Jean Talon Gospel Hall +1943-1948+
  • Ogilvy Avenue Gospel Hall +1950-1982
  • Assemblee Evangelique Grace +2013+

Locations

  • 682 St. Roch St. 1926-1936+
  • 750 Jean Talon +1943-1948+
  • 821 Ogilvy Ave. +1950-1980+
  • 519 Stanstead Ave., Mount Royal +1982-1993
  • 3901 Henri-Bourassa Blvd. West @ St. Laurent 1994-2006
  • 50 Fifth Ave. @ Pincourt 2007-2020+

Correspondents

  • William E. Reid @ Mt. Royal +1936-1966
  • R.A. Hamilton 1967-1969
  • J.H. Comte 1970-1971
  • W. Wardrop 1972-1974
  • R. Mathieu 1975-2000+
  • Stephen Johnston @ Beaconsfield +2003-2020+
  • Gilles Bouchard 2008-2009
  • Paul Garnet +2013-2020+

Alumni

Sources

History

  • 1 George W. Dixon's uncopyrighted "Looking Backward Pressing Forward", c.1993

AAB's

  • Light & Liberty Publishing Assembly Address Book: 1936
  • Walterick Publishers Assembly Address Books: 1943, 1948, 1950, 1954-1956, 1958-1980, 1982-1983, 1985-1987, 1989-2000, 2003-2004, 2006-2008
  • ECS Ministries (Emmaus International) Assembly Address Books: 2009-2010, 2013-2014, 2016, 2018, 2020

Other